You can now claim ownership of your own photos on Facebook and Instagram

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Facebook has previously made it possible for you to use their Rights Manager to secure video material on your accounts. They are now implementing the same security for images — including on Instagram.

“We want to make Facebook a secure and useful place for creators to share their content,” Facebook wrote on their announcement page. The Image Rights Manager uses image matching technology to help creators and publishers secure and handle their image content on a scale. According to Facebook, the tool is best used by creators who have a broad or increasing catalogue of content. The intention is to gradually open up this functionality to everyone. For the time being, page admins may request an application for content they have developed and want to protect.

In the application, you will be asked to fill out responses to questions such as who the primary rights holder is, how would you describe your content, how much you post it, and if you’ve previously published a copyright report on Facebook? You’ll still be able to type in where else your page appears online (Instagram? YouTube?)—but that’s optional. If your application has been accepted, you can submit your photographs to the Rights Manager. You’ll be able to track where they turn up, like on the Instagram accounts. Then you can opt to let the photos remain up or issue a take-down — which completely eliminates the infringing article. You may also use a territorial block, which ensures that the post remains alive but is not accessible in the territories where the copyright of the company applies.

The latest update may be a step in the right direction, but Facebook has gained a reputation for not taking content down quickly enough. When American right-wing news outlet Breitbart posted a video that reported that hydroxychloroquine was a COVID-19 ‘cure’ and that masks were useless to combat the virus, Facebook was under pressure to keep it on the site for too long. – Adapted from The Verge

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Read more interesting stories like this.
Read more interesting stories like this.

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